Computational Cameras and Displays

Computational photography has become an increasingly active area of research within the computer vision community. Within the few last years, the amount of research has grown tremendously with dozens of published papers per year in a variety of vision, optics, and graphics venues. A similar trend can be seen in the emerging field of computational displays – spurred by the widespread availability of precise optical and material fabrication technologies, the research community has begun to investigate the joint design of display optics and computational processing. Such displays are not only designed for human observers but also for computer vision applications, providing high-dimensional structured illumination that varies in space, time, angle, and the color spectrum. This workshop is designed to unite the computational camera and display communities in that it considers to what degree concepts from computational cameras can inform the design of emerging computational displays and vice versa, both focused on applications in computer vision.

The CCD workshop series serves as an annual gathering place for researchers and practitioners who design, build, and use computational cameras, displays, and projector-camera systems for a wide variety of uses. The workshop solicits papers, posters, and demo submissions on all topics relating to projector-camera systems.

Previous CCD Workshops:
CCD2018, CCD2017, CCD2016, CCD2015, CCD2014, CCD2013, CCD2012

Important Dates

  • Poster/demo submission deadline: April 30th 2019
  • Poster/demo decision: May 7th 2019
  • Workshop date: June 17th 2019

 

Venue

The CCD workshop is part of the CVPR 2019 workshops. Please see the CVPR webpage for information on venue, accommodations, and other details!

Participate

Poster/Demo Submissions

CCD 2019 posters and demos give an opportunity to showcase previously published or yet-to-be published work to a larger community in CVPR 2019. This year our deadline for poster/demo submissions for CCD 2019, will be Tuesday, April 30th 2019. Decisions will be made by Tuesday May 7th 2019.

*Note: Submitted abstracts do not appear in any proceedings.

Submissions should include 1-2 paragraphs describing the proposed poster/demo, as well as author names and affiliations. Please send submissions by email directly to: ccd.workshop.2019@gmail.com.

Program

13:30 – 13:45 Welcome and Opening Remarks
13:45 – 14:15

Keynote talk

Jon Barron, Google Research

Title: TBD

14:15 – 14:45

Keynote talk

Grace Kuo, UC Berkeley

Title: DiffuserCam: Compact Lensless Cameras for 3D Imaging.

14:45 – 15:15 Poster spotlights.
15:15 – 16:30 Coffee break, Posters and demos.
16:30 – 17:00

Keynote Talk

Yaser Ajmal Sheikh, Robotics Institute - Carnegie Mellon and Occulus Research

Title: TBD

17:00 – 17:30

Keynote Talk

John Miao, Coherent Imaging Group at UCLA

Title: Exploring the 3D Nano and Atomic World with Computational Microscopy.

17:30 – 17:45

Keynote talk

Tali Treibitz, Marine Imaging Lab at Leon H. Charney

Title: Insights from the Deep: How Can we Improve Underwater Vision?

17:45 – 18:00 Closing Remarks

Keynote Talks

Grace

Grace Kuo, UC Berkeley

Title: DiffuserCam: Compact Lensless Cameras for 3D Imaging.

Bio: Grace Kuo a PhD student in the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley, advised by Professor Laura Waller and Professor Ren Ng. She graduated from Washington University in St. Louis in 2015 with a degree in Electrical Engineering. Her research is in computational imaging, which is the joint design of hardware and algorithms for imaging systems. I work at the intersection of optics, signal processing, computer graphics, and optimization.

Jon Barron

Jon Barron, Google Research

Title:TBA.

Bio: Jon Barron a staff research scientist at Google Research, where he works on computer vision and computational photography. At Google he's worked on Lens Blur, HDR+, Jump, Portrait Mode, and Glass. Jon did his PhD at UC Berkeley, where he was advised by Jitendra Malik and funded by the NSF GRFP. He has spent time at Google[x], MIT CSAIL, Captricity, NASA Ames, Google NYC, the NYU MRL, Novartis, and Astrometry.net. Jon finished his bachelors at the University of Toronto.

Jianwei (John) Miao

John Miao, Coherent Imaging Group at UCLA

Title: Exploring the 3D Nano and Atomic World with Computational Microscopy.

Bio: Jianwei (John) Miao is Professor of Physics & Astronomy and California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA. He received a Ph. D. in Physics, a M. S. in computer science, and an Advanced Graduate Certificate in Biomedical Engineering from State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1999. After graduation, he became a Staff Scientist at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University. In 2004, he moved to UCLA as an Assistant Professor and was promoted to Full Professor in 2009. Miao is an internationally renowned pioneer in the development of novel imaging methods with X-rays and electrons, and has made contributions to theory, computation, and experiment. He theoretically explained under what conditions the phase problem of non-crystalline specimens can be solved in 1998. A year later, he performed the seminal experiment on extending X-ray crystallography to allow structural determination of non-crystalline specimens, which is known as coherent diffractive imaging (CDI), lensless or computational microscopy. CDI methods including Bragg CDI and ptychography have been broadly implemented using synchrotron radiation, X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), high harmonic generation, optical lasers, and electrons. It has also become one of the major justifications for the construction of XFELs worldwide, each of which costs hundreds of millions of dollars.

Tali Treibitz

Tali Treibitz, Marine Imaging Lab at Leon H. Charney

Title: Insights from the Deep: How Can we Improve Underwater Vision?

Bio: Tali is the head of the Marine Imaging Lab, in the Department for Marine Technologies, Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa. Previously she was a post-doc, working with David Kriegman in the Computer Vision group, Computer Science and Engineering department in the University of California, San Diego and with Jules Jaffe in the Jaffe laboratory for Underwater Imaging in the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Yaser Sheikh

Yaser Ajmal Sheikh, Robotics Insitute - Carnegie Mellon and Occulus Research Pittsburgh

Title:TBA.

Bio: Yaser Sheikh is an Associate Professor at the Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University. He also leads Oculus Research Pittsburgh, a Facebook lab focused on Social VR. His research is focused on machine perception and rendering of social behavior, spanning sub-disciplines in computer vision, computer graphics, and machine learning. He has won Popular Science's Best of What's New Award, the Honda Initiation Award (2010), best paper awards at WACV (2012), SAP (2012), SCA (2010), and ICCV THEMIS (2009). Yaser has served as a senior committee member at leading conferences in computer vision, computer graphics, and robotics including SIGGRAPH (2013, 2014), CVPR (2014, 2015), ICRA (2014, 2016), ICCP (2011), and served as an Associate Editor of CVIU. His research is sponsored by various government research offices, including NSF and DARPA, and several industrial partners including the Intel Corporation, the Walt Disney Company, Nissan, Honda, Toyota, and the Samsung Group. His research has been featured by various media outlets including The New York Times, The Verge, Popular Science, BBC, MSNBC, New Scientist, slashdot, and WIRED. He received his PhD in 2006 from the University of Central Florida advised by Prof. Mubarak Shah, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in 2008 at Carnegie Mellon University under the mentorship of Takeo Kanade.

Accepted Posters

Wave-Based Non-Line-of-Sight Imaging using Fast f-k Migration David B. Lindell
Acoustic Non-Line-of-Sight Imaging David B. Lindell
Image and Depth Estimation with Mask-Based Lensless Cameras Salman Asif
Extreme Flux Imaging with Photon Counting Detectors Atul Ingle
Efficient Scatter and Beam-Hardening Correction Cone-Beam CT Thilo Balke
Sual camera Bokeh smartphone demo David Liu
TW-SMNet: Multitask Deep Neural Networks for Tele-Wide Stereo Matching Mostafa El-Khamy
Glitter Imaging for Single Image Camera Calibration Maya Shende
PhaseCam3D - Learning Phase Masks for Passive Single View Depth Estimation Yicheng Wu
WISH: Wavefront Imaging Sensor with High Resolution Yicheng Wu
A Study on Sparsity Promoting Regularization Techniques with Full Constraints for Spectral Unmixing John Janiczek
Low Cost Edge Sensing for High Quality Demosaicking Yan Niu
Subsampled Fourier Ptychography Using Generative Priors Fahad Shamshad
Phase Retrieval through Scattering Media via Generative Models Fahad Shamshad
Towards Photorealistic Reconstruction of Highly Multiplexed Lensless Images Salman S. Khan
3D Imaging with Photon-Flooded Single-Photon Sensors Anant Gupta
Radiometric Compensation of Projector Displays by Modeling the Human Colour Response and Projector-Camera System Nonlinearity Matthew Post
Visual Deprojection Guha Balakrishnan
Low-Power Adaptive LIDAR with Deep Depth Completion Francesco Pittaluga

People

Workshop chairs

Sanjeev J. Koppal, University of Florida
Katie Bouman, California Institute of Technology
Ioannis Gkioulekas, Carnegie Mellon University

Sponsors

We are grateful to the following sponsors.

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